Brian Ramone Childers

  1985 -
  City of Birth:
Vancouver
 
 

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I am adding this additional chapter to my introduction, because after I initially wrote the introduction, it was very difficult to come back to it and try to make sense of all that I have experienced through the various stages of my life and the trials that I have endured or overcome.  I wish ...


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The story has already been written for awhile on my blog "From the heart of Praise, Prayer and Perseverance. 0; Here is a link to that posting, Below are the pictures of the blessed event.   http://fromthehea rt-dotwigg.blogsp ot.com/2008/03/an other-2-prayer-re quest-answered.ht ml


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Brian's Story > Categories > Stupid Things I've Done

"I Know What I Did This Winter" 

 

Date Range: 01/01/1985 To 12/31/2007   Comments: 10   Views: 8,393
Attachments: No
 


This past winter was a great one. The weather didn't always cooperate for the best skiing, and the season was iffy for a while when we got off to a late start, but by January the snow money maker kicked back in and off we went. I got in four big trips - two to Vancouver and one in Ontario. My goal is to hit every major ski resort in the world during my life time. I'm working on the North American continent now, then I'll move to Europe and work my way through there, and then on to Asia.

I"m not a total extreme skiier - I don't do crazy jumps off the sides of 4000 ft cliffs like some people. I do, however, (or at least twice now) have gone into the backwoods and been dropped off by helicopters to ski down fresh powder.

When you're (basically) alone out there (you never ski alone but it's easy to lose the few other people you go with), you can't even begin to understand how alone and how BIG the world is. And how small, and vulnerable we are. We're not really equipped to handle extreme weather conditions, but we're smart and resourceful so we survive by our cunning.

The 2nd time I got dropped we were not using a service, which is riskier because they've got staff ready and waiting. If you get hurt or lost you have to wait for the mounties and if they are on another emergency call you might be de-prioritized. Those dudes- they are seriously REAL men & women. We got to talk to a group of them when we were getting ready. Apparently they'd been in to provide some updates on training and shifting weather conditions to the rescue team of the drop service. They looked liked they'd been sleeping on glaciers for the past ten years - rough, man. Lined faces, wind burnt, leathery skin. They looked like they hiked through blizzards just for fun.

They had St. Bernard's with them. The biggest, slobberiest, most gentle animals ever - and smart and strong and good at their jobs. I can imagine if I was stuck in a blizzard or avalanche seeing that dog's face and tail wagging would be the best vision EVER.

The rescue team is seriously hard core. They make that TV show Survivor Man look like a wuss. 

Anyway we packed our gear - most of is rescue gear in case we got lost or trapped, which happens. Every year people die doing this. You do have that as a mental note in your mind but if you go in thinking about that, you can get careless and make stupid mistakes.

The fliers know the land like the back of their hand, but it still doesn't ready you for the experience of how you'll feel when you're up in that helicopter. You feel - small. Very, very small. You're just another piece of living organism that could well die there and be swallowed up and no one would ever notice/find you.

The helicopter takes you to the top of the mountain (no we did not jump with skis ON from the copter like they show in movies). We do a gear check - flashlights, food, water filter, distress signal, warmers. We strap the backpacks and get ready. There is no cell service up here. There isn't much of ANYTHING up here, except a mountain, and clean, clean snow. 

Snowing where no one has been isn't like skiing at a resort. Even on the first run on the very first snow before any other humans have been there, the land has been cleared. You KNOW it's safe. There is absolutely no such guarantees - you don't know what's unde that snow - a fallen tree, a dead animal, whatever. 

But the expanse of white is blinding, dazzling. You give a thumbs up, a little fear gnawing at the back of your mind that this may well be the last thing you ever do, and go for it.

Exhilarating. Scary. Fast. WILD. 

And when you reach the bottom, you look back up, wanting to do it again, and again, and again...

 



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Member Since
May 2009
Klarity Belle said:
posted on Jun 18, 2009
Skiing

Great stuff Brian, it's wonderful that you discovered your passion for skiing young in life. I reckon you will complete your mission to ski every major resort. My only off piste experience was the Vallee Blanche last year and I was terrified. Glad I did it though but never again and as for heli skiing, I will settle for enjoying reading experiences like yours, I can imagine the joy of witnessing that untouched beauty and the exhilaration of skiing down it, just won't ever experience it first hand!


Member Since
Nov 2008
Roger Elliott said:
posted on Jun 20, 2009
Not so

Your writing is far better than most. Try taking what you know, and make something else of it. You will find that working at a story is something you like, or not. The truth is always a good place to start, but why not lead us on a little bit.


Member Since
Jan 2009
Sam Henderson said:
posted on Jun 21, 2009
Dear Brian

You're crazy.

The end.

:)
sam


Member Since
Aug 2007
Brian Childers said:
posted on Jun 22, 2009
yo

hi Roger - lead you on how? I'm not following what you're saying, sorry man

Klarity - need to make sure you take some risks sometimes though.... you'll be amazed at how great you feel after.

Sam - yup

The end.
Brian


Member Since
Nov 2008
Roger Elliott said:
posted on Jun 22, 2009
lead me on

Just trying to encourage your risk taking in your writing as well. The thrill is there too, just different. What you are doing is great, don't get me wrong...but using that experience to tell a different story would also be great How would the story go if you started out with ," The expanse of white is blinding, dazzling. You give a thumbs up, a little fear gnawing at the back of your mind that this may well be the last thing you ever do, and go for it." and went from there. That would really draw the readers in. Just an idea.


Member Since
Aug 2007
Brian Childers said:
posted on Jun 22, 2009
thanks

that's not how I write though.... so wouldn't really be a legitimate "me" voice. You're the good writer and I don't aspire to write like a novel or as good as you, just want to record my life :) will keep in mind though; but my work will never be published - lolz


Member Since
May 2009
Klarity Belle said:
posted on Jun 23, 2009
Never say never!

How about a skiier's log of all the adventures in all the resorts you have your offpiste adventures in? That could be published and in your own voice! Every hardcore snow enthusiast I ever met was more interested in how much powder there is and what the mountain's challenges are and couldn't care less about the delivery of the prose. You are right on the risk factor, having kids holds me back on that one though - oh and lack of skill, but that doesn't stop me loving the white stuff just the same.


Member Since
Aug 2007
Brian Childers said:
posted on Jun 23, 2009
writing

lol, you give me way too much credit for discipline and ability to stay focused on one thing longer than 10 minutes ;)


Member Since
May 2009
Klarity Belle said:
posted on Jun 24, 2009
Funny

You will age though and that will change!  Its' gona take you at least a couple of decades to get around all those resorts, by which time you'll have less strength for skiing but plenty time for writing about it all lol!


Member Since
Aug 2007
Brian Childers said:
posted on Jun 25, 2009
sure

maybe

if i don't die first

or at least that's what my mother keeps telling me ;)